Who coined the concept of intersectionality?

Who coined the concept of intersectionality?

In 1989, Kimberlé Crenshaw coined the term "intersectionality" in a paper as a way to help explain the oppression of African-American women. Crenshaw's term is now at the forefront of national conversations about racial justice, identity politics, and policing—and over the years has helped shape legal discussions.

What does intersectionality mean in feminism?

Kimberlé Crenshaw, an American law professor who coined the term in 1989 explained Intersectional feminism as, “a prism for seeing the way in which various forms of inequality often operate together and exacerbate each other,” in a recent interview with Time. “All inequality is not created equal,” she says.

What is the meaning of the word intersectionality?

(Oxford Dictionary) Intersectionality is a framework for conceptualizing a person, group of people, or social problem as affected by a number of discriminations and disadvantages. It takes into account people's overlapping identities and experiences in order to understand the complexity of prejudices they face.

What does intersectional harassment mean?

Intersectional harassment is defined as harassment that's committed on the basis of multiple identities. African-American women, for instance, are subject to a greater rate of sexual harassment than Caucasian American women, presumably due to their marginalized racial and gender identity.

Why is it important to understand intersectionality?

In the business world, understanding intersectionality is an important part of practicing inclusion because it defines how different facets of identity contribute to our unique perspective and team participation, as well as the ways in which different types of discrimination overlap with one another.

What is intersectionality education?

Intersectionality is the study of how various forms of oppression, discrimination, domination and other social processes intersect and influence each other. For example, students in schools can belong to more than one marginalized group.

What does standpoint theory mean?

Standpoint theory, a feminist theoretical perspective that argues that knowledge stems from social position. The perspective denies that traditional science is objective and suggests that research and theory have ignored and marginalized women and feminist ways of thinking.

What is the Indigenous standpoint theory?

In his influential work, Torres Strait Islander scholar Martin Nakata defines Indigenous. standpoint theory as “a method of inquiry, a process for making more intelligible 'the corpus of. objectified knowledge about us' as it emerges and organises understanding of our lived. realities.”

Who created standpoint theory?

Nancy Hartsock

Who is the main proponent of feminist standpoint theory?

Sandra Harding is the main canonizing force behind feminist standpoint theory.

Who coined feminist theory?

Charles Fourier, a utopian socialist and French philosopher, is credited with having coined the word "féminisme" in 1837. The words "féminisme" ("feminism") and "féministe" ("feminist") first appeared in France and the Netherlands in 1872, Great Britain in the 1890s, and the United States in 1910.

What are the three central claims of feminist standpoint epistemology?

Feminist standpoint theorists make three principal claims: (1) Knowledge is socially situated. (2) Marginalized groups are socially situated in ways that make it more possible for them to be aware of things and ask questions than it is for the non-marginalized.

How is the third wave of feminism different from the second wave?

The second wave, at its height in the 1960s and 1970s, refers to the women's liberation movement for equal legal and social rights. The third wave, beginning in the 1990s, refers to a continuation of, and a reaction to, second-wave feminism.