What is Interactionist theory of language learning?

What is Interactionist theory of language learning?

The interactionist approach (sociocultural theory) combines ideas from sociology and biology to explain how language is developed. According to this theory, children learn language out of a desire to communicate with the world around them. Language emerges from, and is dependent upon, social interaction.

How does a functionalist view education?

Functionalists believe that education provides unity and togetherness and has a positive impact on society. They also believe that education prepares people for the work environment in later life and teaches important skills.

What is the new right view of education?

According to the New Right's beliefs, the role of education is to instil drive, initiative and enterprise. The New Right believe this will come from competition between schools and colleges, motivating teachers to improve standards and providing parents and students with a choice of schools and colleges.

What do feminist say about education?

Feminists believe that education is an agent of secondary socialisation that helps to enforce patriarchy. They look at society on a MACRO scale. They want to generalise their ideas about males and females to the whole of society.

What is the new right view on family?

Like Functionalists, the New Right hold the view that there is only one correct or normal family type. This is the traditional or conventional nuclear family. Again like Functionalists, The New Right sees this family as 'natural' and based on fundamental biological differences between men and women.

What is the postmodernist view on education?

Post modernists argue that education has become more diverse and responsive to the needs of different individuals and groups. In their view the correspondence principle no longer exists and education reproduces diversity not inequality.

What are the elements of postmodernism?

Postmodernism, also spelled post-modernism, in Western philosophy, a late 20th-century movement characterized by broad skepticism, subjectivism, or relativism; a general suspicion of reason; and an acute sensitivity to the role of ideology in asserting and maintaining political and economic power.