What is colonialism quizlet sociology?

What is colonialism quizlet sociology?

colonialism. the process by which some nations enrich themselves through political and economic control of other nations. A set of unequal relationships between the colonizers and the colony and between the colonists and the indigenous populations.

Which of the following is one of the characteristics shared by ethnic groups?

Ethnicity is considered to be shared characteristics such as culture, language, religion, and traditions, which contribute to a person or group's identity.

What are the 5 main characteristics of ethnic groups?

Membership of an ethnic group tends to be defined by a shared cultural heritage, ancestry, origin myth, history, homeland, language or dialect, symbolic systems such as religion, mythology and ritual, cuisine, dressing style, art or physical appearance.

Who are black and minority ethnic groups?

'Black, Asian and minority ethnic' (BAME) is an umbrella term and can include the following ethnic origins:

  • Arabs.
  • Asian or Asian British people.
  • Black or Black British people.
  • People of mixed heritage.
  • Roma, Gypsies and Travellers.

What are the 5 characteristics of minority groups?

According to Charles Wagley and Marvin Harris (1958), a minority group is distinguished by five characteristics: (1) unequal treatment and less power over their lives, (2) distinguishing physical or cultural traits like skin colour or language, (3) involuntary membership in the group, (4) awareness of subordination, ...

What does minority status mean?

Many definitions of minority status refer to a category of people who experience relative disadvantage in relation to members of a dominant social group.

Who is considered minority?

A minority person is a citizen of the United States who is African American, Hispanic, Native American, Asian Pacific, or Asian Indian. African American is a US citizen who has origins in any of the African racial groups of Africa, and is regarded as such by the community of which the person claims to be a part.

What are the four types of minority groups?

But in the 1990s, the term “minority” usually refers to four major racial and ethnic groups: African Americans, American Indians and Alaska Natives, Asians and Pacific Islanders, and Hispanics. This transformation of America's racial and ethnic profile is most visible in certain states and communities.

What does minority ethnic mean?

An ethnic minority is a group of people who differ in race or color or in national, religious, or cultural origin from the dominant group — often the majority population — of the country in which they live.

What groups are considered minorities in the US?

There are seven key minority and indigenous groupings: Latinos (including Puerto Ricans), African Americans, Asian Americans, Arab and other Middle Eastern Americans, Native Americans, Native Hawai'ians and other Pacific Islanders, and Alaska Natives.

Who are underrepresented minorities?

At UCSF our working definition of an underrepresented minority (URM) is someone whose racial or ethnic makeup is from one of the following: African American / Black. Asian: Filipino, Hmong*, or Vietnamese only. Hispanic / Latinx.

What does underrepresented minority mean?

The definition of Underrepresented minority is far from being crystal clear. However, the URM designation is relatively consistent among schools. Underrepresented Minority can be defined as a group whose percentage of the population in a given group is lower than their percentage of the population in the country.

Who are underrepresented minorities in medicine?

The AAMC definition of underrepresented in medicine includes Blacks, Mexican-Americans, Native Americans (that is, American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians), and mainland Puerto Ricans.

Who are underrepresented students?

This term includes students from groups who have been traditionally underrepresented in education abroad, such as racial/ethnic minorities, first-‐generation college students, students with disabilities, students from lower socio-‐economic households, students in underrepresented majors, community college students, ...

What are examples of underrepresented groups?

The following racial and ethnic groups have been shown by the National Science Foundation to be underrepresented in health-related sciences on a national basis: Blacks or African Americans, Hispanics or Latinos, American Indians or Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders.

What makes you a nontraditional student?

A student who did not receive a standard high school diploma, but reported completing high school either through passing a General Education Development (GED) exam or other equivalency exam, or receiving a certificate of high school completion was considered nontraditional.

What are non traditional college students?

The National Center for Education Statistics defines nontraditional students as meeting one of seven characteristics: delayed enrollment into postsecondary education; attends college part-time; works full time; is financially independent for financial aid purposes; has dependents other than a spouse; is a single parent ...

What is the difference between traditional and nontraditional students?

Unlike the majority of "traditionally" aged students, "nontraditional" students must cope with additional barriers outside the classroom. Many "non- traditional" students have a spouse, children, and hold a full-time job in addition to going to school.

What is a post traditional student?

Post-traditional learners are students who frequently must balance life, work, and their education. These students are typically ages 25 and older, care for dependents, and work full time while enrolled, and are often connected to the military.

What does traditional student mean?

A traditional student is a category of students at colleges and universities. In the United States, it is used to refer to post-secondary students between under 25 years old who enroll directly from high school, attend full-time, and do not have major life and work responsibilities (e.g., full-time job or dependents).

What are older students called?

upperclassmen

What age is a nontraditional student?

Age: Typically, students who start college at age 25 or older are labeled nontraditional. College Experience: Those who went to college previously but did not complete their degree are often considered nontraditional transfer students.

What is a commuter student?

Commuter students are defined as those who do not live in institution-owned housing on campuses. They make up more than 85 percent of today's college students.

What is a commuting?

Commuting is periodically recurring travel between one's place of residence and place of work or study, where the traveler leaves the boundary of their home community. It sometimes refers to any regular or often repeated traveling between locations, even when not work-related.

What does commuter status mean?

Permanent resident in commuter status is an exception made available to some residents of Canada and Mexico. “Commuter status” allows these individuals to live in Canada or Mexico, while working in the United States, without risking abandoning their resident status.

What is considered a commuter?

The IRS Commuter Rule is defined as “transportation between your home and your main or regular place of work.” Your workplace is deemed “regular” if you have worked there for a year, or expect to. Contrary to what many people believe, these types of commutes are considered personal.

What counts as commuting for insurance?

Commuting. Commuting is the next class up, and covers everything included in Social, Domestic and Pleasure, plus driving to and from a permanent place of work. Driving your car to the train station and leaving it there while you go to work counts as commuting.